Apsari Chakma: Life in the School Room

The author. Source: Thotkata.net

The author. Source: Thotkata.net

When I was very little my mother used to tell me all kinds of bedtime fairytale stories. I used to think that the fairy princesses from these stories were supremely happy and content. You could say, my life now is the exact opposite of their lives.

Life in the School Room

by Apsari Chakma, translated by Tibra Ali for AlalODulal.org Continue reading

Publishing the images of teen sex workers is nothing but a showcase of poverty

©Andrew Biraj/Reuters

©Andrew Biraj/Reuters

টিনেজ যৌনকর্মীদের ছবি প্রকাশ, দারিদ্র্যতা শো করা ছাড়া অন্য কিছু না  – মৃদুল শাওন

ফেসবুকে কয়েকজনরে দেখলাম একটা লিঙ্ক শেয়ার দিতাছে। ‘BuzzFeed’ নামের একটা আমেরিকান ওয়েবসাইটে বাংলাদেশের টিনেজ-যৌনকর্মীদের তিরিশটা ছবি। শিরোনাম- “30 Tragic, Beautiful Photos Of Teenage Prostitutes In Bangladesh”। Continue reading

While Taranco negotiates: political games & sexual violence

The fall (© Faheem Haider)

© Faheem Haider for AlalODulal.org

While Taranco negotiates: political games & sexual violence
by Faruk Wasif for Prothom Alo
Translated for AlalODulal.org by Emon Sarwar

Two women are fighting in the capital city- the centre of power; hands and legs of the people are tied. In Jessore a mother and her daughter were raped simultaneously, father and bother had to watch it happening — their hands and legs were tied up too.

Continue reading

Let’s talk about Rape (in Bangladesh)

Protesting  violence on Yasmin Day to mark the fateful incident of a fourteen year old girl, who was raped and murdered by a group of police.

Protesting violence on Yasmin Day to mark the fateful incident of a fourteen year old girl, who was raped and murdered by a group of police.

Let’s talk about Rape (in Bangladesh)

By Nadine S. Murshid for AlalODulal.org

There is something fundamentally wrong with men (and women) who rape. It is a maladaptation of sex, a manifestation of psychopathology, a sign of being a sociopath or a psychopath, a tool to garner control, and an outward expression of deep internal anger and resentment.  In the context of Bangladesh (as elsewhere), it is also a response to sexual repression, lack of education about sex and appropriate sexual behaviors, and patriarchal values that give men (or those with power) the right to dominate and control women and their bodies (or, whichever party is deemed to be powerless).

Continue reading

Allama Shafi: The Tetul Misogynist

Allma Shafi, the leader of Hefazat-e-Islam.  He is also the rector of Al-Jamiatul Ahlia Darul Ulum Moinul Islam in Hathazari Chittagong, and the chairman of Bangladesh Qawmi Madrasah Education Board of Bangladesh. Photo source: www.asiapostbd.com

Allma Shafi, the leader of Hefazat-e-Islam. He is also the rector of Al-Jamiatul Ahlia Darul Ulum Moinul Islam in Hathazari Chittagong, and the chairman of Bangladesh Qawmi Madrasah Education Board of Bangladesh. Photo source: http://www.asiapostbd.com

The Tetul Misogynist
by Samara Mortada for AlalODulal.org

Not many have missed the video of Allama Shafi, or at least not heard/read about it, in which he compares women to tamarind (tetul) fruit. Continue reading

Dina Siddiqi: Do Bangladeshi factory workers need saving? Sisterhood in the post-sweatshop era

© Tushikur Rahman Aroti,18, was working on the 6th floor. She was rescued after 2 days of the building collapse. The rescuer had to cut her right leg to get her out of the building. Her mother and father were also working in the same building. Her mother 'Titon'' died and her body was rescued on the first night and her father 'Odhir Dash'' got rescued on the first night of the incident.

© Tushikur Rahman


This 2009 article revisits the figure of the ‘third world sweatshop worker’, long iconic of the excesses of the global expansion of flexible accumulation in late twentieth-century capitalism. I am interested in how feminist activists concerned with the uneven impact of neo-liberal policies can engage in progressive political interventions without participating in the ‘culture of global moralism’ that continues to surround conventional representations of third world workers.
Continue reading